Publications on Global Security Governance

Upcoming Event: “UN Security Council and Climate Change: Bully Pulpit or Bull in a China Shop?”

intern1 : December 15, 2017 1:34 pm : Events 2017, Global Security Governance, Highlights from New York, Publications on Global Security Governance, Publications on Reforming the United Nations, Reforming the United Nations

Wednesday, December 20, 1:15 pm – 2:45 pm
United Nations HQ – New York
Delegates Dining Room

(by invitation only)

Amid growing concerns that climate change will affect international peace and security, over the last decade the issue has emerged on a regular basis on the agenda of the UN Security Council. A new FES New York publication therefore examines options for meaningful Council action on climate-related challenges to peace and security. The discussion event, co-hosted by the Missions of Germany and Uruguay to the UN and FESNY, will feature the publication’s lead author Ken Conca from the American University in Washington. His presentation of the paper will be the starting point for a discussion that will also address whether action on climate change could trigger transformation and reform of the Security Council.

Program

 

Comments are closed

New Publication – “Climate Change and Global Security – What Role for the UN Security Council?”

intern1 : October 18, 2017 3:19 pm : Global Security Governance, Highlights from New York, Publications on Global Security Governance, Publications on Reforming the United Nations, Reforming the United Nations

by Ken Conca, Joe Thwaites and Goueun Lee

October 2017

The UN Security Council is increasingly under pressure to address climate change as a threat to international peace and security. Yet disagreements about the Council’s mandate as well as its current mode of operation render the body ill-suited for tackling climate change-related challenges. This publication discusses whether action on climate change could trigger transformation of the Council into an organ better suited for the world’s 21st century challenges in general. Reform proposals include forward-looking initiatives supported by affected states, as well as coordinated symbolic gestures from the Permanent Five Security Council Members.

Download the publication here.

Comments are closed

Recent Event: “Protecting Rights, Remediating the Environment: Addressing the Harm from Nuclear Weapons”

intern1 : June 15, 2017 5:52 pm : Events, Global Security Governance, Highlights from New York, Publications on Global Security Governance

Wednesday, June 21, 1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

United Nations HQ – New York Conference Room B

This panel discussion was a side event during the negotiating conference on a nuclear weapons ban treaty. Discussants assessed  the positive obligations in the first draft of the treaty, suggested ways to improve them, and highlighted why such revisions would be particularly important to the prohibition treaty. By promoting the inclusion of strong positive obligations in the new legal instrument prohibiting nuclear weapons, this event helped ensure that the treaty not only builds on previous humanitarian disarmament treaties but it also contributes to the SDGs and the 2030 Agenda.

To read about the event click here.

Download the program here.

Comments are closed

New Publication – FES Perspective: “The Nuclear Weapons Ban and Human Security for All: Assessing the Draft Convention on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons from a Human Security Perspective”

intern1 : June 15, 2017 5:44 pm : Highlights from New York, Publications on Global Security Governance

by Matthew Bolton

June 2017

Efforts to abolish nuclear weapons have regained momentum by the current negotiations for a nuclear weapons ban treaty. Despite the resistance from nuclear powers, the majority of UN Member States is determined to come to an agreement in July 2017. This publication discusses proposals for a strong, human-security-based treaty that would include references to human rights and environmental law, explicitly prohibit financing nuclear weapons production, and strengthen positive obligations on victim assistance and on environmental remediation. The author also suggests that the agreement should include a pathway towards engagement and eventual accession for nuclear-armed and nuclear alliance states.

Download the publication here.

Comments are closed

Publication: “The Silk Road Economic Belt: Security Implications and EU–China Cooperation Prospects” by Ghiasy and Jiayi Zhou

intern1 : February 23, 2017 11:52 am : Highlights from New York, Publications on Global Security Governance

Richard Ghiasy and Jiayi Zhou

Publication by SIPRI in collaboration with FES

February 2017

FES New York is pleased to share this new publication: “The Silk Road Economic Belt: Security Implications and EU-China Cooperation”, which is a result of the FES project work on Asia in collaboration with SIPRI.

The Silk Road Economic Belt (the ‘Belt’) component of the Belt and Road Initiative, announced by Xi Jinping over four years ago, represents an ambitious Chinese vision to promote infrastructural development and connectivity, and stimulate economic integration across the Eurasian continent. Ostensibly an economic initiative, the Belt also has important strategic implications, and is likely to interact with local security dynamics in many of the states with which China is partnering in a significant way. This report examines the wider security dynamics related to the Belt, at a geopolitical as well as intra-state level – and provides a number of cooperation avenues for the EU and China. The report is based on a one-year desk study as five regional workshops conducted over the course of 2016. It consists of three parts. First, it describes what the Belt is, what has driven China to initiate it, and how it relates to China’s security interests. It then examines security implications of and security risks to the Belt in two important regions of Central and South Asia. Finally, the report assesses how the Belt fits into EU interests, and provides recommendations for EU-China cooperation, to maximize positive spillovers of the Belt and to mitigate common security concerns. This project and its final report fill a gap in the discourse on the more localized and regional political implications of the Belt,for all stakeholders. Bringing together viewpoints from experts, academics, and policymakers across Eurasia, the report provides a comprehensive view how China’s initiative may affect the strategic landscape, and how the EU policymakers should best engage with it.

Download the publication here

Link to SIPRI’s publication announcement here

 

Comments are closed

New Publication – FES Perspective “Rights and Environmental Protection Following Paris and the SDGs: Towards a Stronger Role for the United Nations” by Ken Conca

intern1 : September 30, 2016 11:26 am : Global Economic Governance, Global Security Governance, Publications on Global Economic Governance, Publications on Global Security Governance, Uncategorized

Ken Conca
FES New York – Perspective, September 2016
ISBN:  978-3-95861-598-4

The author Ken Conca argues that the UN’s current approach to protect the environment has run up against the structural limitations of an increasingly globalized economy. Yet successful implementation of the Paris Climate Accord and the Sustainable Development Goals will require making human rights visible again and recognizing people as rights holders, not just stakeholders. Conca recommends that policy initiatives take into account extra-territorial impacts on local communities in other countries, especially those who are most vulnerable. Moreover, the UN’s rights machinery should be deployed to protect the rights and safety of environmental defenders who challenge governments and transnational economic agents.

Download the publication here

Comments are closed

Publication: “How to Achieve Sustainable Peace: The Radical Potential of Implementing UN Sustainable Development Goal 16″

intern1 : July 6, 2016 10:26 am : Global Economic Governance, Global Security Governance, Publications on Global Economic Governance, Publications on Global Security Governance

Sarah Hearn
FES Perspective, June 2016
ISBN 978-3-95861-505-2

The UN Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16 promotes peaceful and inclusive societies and endorses accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. This Perspective offers ideas on a roadmap for implementing SDG 16 that will be relevant for this year’s UN’s High-Level Political Forum. In line with the topic for the upcoming UN discussions to leave no one behind, the author suggests focusing on the poorest and most conflict-affected countries, such as the g7+ and other least developed countries. The UN, according to the author, can support government-to-government and society-to-society collaboration, convene global partnerships and identify norm and implementation entrepreneurs.

Download

Comments are closed

Publication: “What’s Peace Got To Do With It?”

intern1 : September 16, 2014 11:27 am : Publications on Global Security Governance

Laura Ribeiro Pereira
FES Perspective, September 2014
ISBN: 978-3-86498-930-8

This Perspective analyzes the political wrangling about the inclusion of a Peace Goal into the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) after 2015. The author explains why in its current form, the Peace Goal is a compromise that will be insufficient to promote peaceful societies. Consequently, she argues for a strategy beyond retaining the Peace Goal as it stands, and to include new topics, such as accountability in the arms industrial complex. However, this would require revisiting existing alliances, since the majority of UN Member States in favour or a Peace Goal are from the industrialized North and are most likely to block these endeavours.

Download

Comments are closed

Publication: “Democratic Emerging Powers and the International Human Rights System”

VolkerL : September 4, 2013 11:38 am : Global Security Governance, Publications on Global Security Governance

Rob Jenkins and Emma Mawdsley
FES International Policy Analysis, August 2013

Democratic Emerging Powers (DEPs) such as Brazil, India, and South Africa, aspire for a more prominent role in global politics. This publication analyzes the hitherto neglected role of DEPs in the international human rights system, based on their involvement in the UN Human Rights Council, the UN Security Council, and the international development machinery. DEP’s have to straddle domestic political pressures, ongoing support for developing countries’ conceptions of state sovereignty, and the protection of national interests from potentially intrusive monitoring regimes. The authors conclude that DEP governments have prioritized pragmatism over principle. Consequently, similar to the established Western democratic powers, DEPs have turned into inconsistent advocates for democracy and human rights on the international stage.

Download

Comments are closed

Publication: “Reforming the Working Methods of the UN Security Council: The Next ACT”

VolkerL : August 13, 2013 4:24 pm : Global Security Governance, Publications on Global Security Governance, Publications on Reforming the United Nations, Reforming the United Nations

Volker Lehmann
FES Perspective, August 2013

In May 2013, some 20 UN member states launched a new initiative to improve the working methods of the UN Security Council. Dubbed “ACT”, the initiative aims for greater accountability, coherence, and transparency in the Council’s activities. This publication gauges this effort against the backdrop of previous stalled attempts to reform either working methods or the composition of the Council. It concludes that ACT’s modest and seemingly technical proposals cut to the highly-political core issues of who controls representation of member states interests and who controls the reform agenda at the UN.

Download

Comments are closed

Publication: “Looking to the Future of the Arms Trade Treaty”

intern1 : April 25, 2013 11:21 am : Global Security Governance, Publications on Global Security Governance, Topics

Katherine Prizeman
FES Perspective, April 2013

After more than one decade of preparations and negotiations, the UN General Assembly adopted the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) in April 2013. The ATT sets important precedents for working towards the goals of prohibiting arms transfers to countries where there is serious risk of violations of human rights and humanitarian law and where arms could potentially thwart peace and security. In addition, the adopted treaty underlines the significance of greater transparency and accountability in global arms trade. However, this publication highlights various shortcomings and loopholes of the ATT. Despite the potential the treaty bears, it remains rather symbolic and normative in meaning. The treaty does not reflect what the majority of states had originally called for, but is, through a consensus-driven process, confined to agreements on the lowest common denominator. More importantly, the adoption of the treaty is not a victory in-and-of-itself, but merely the first step in a long process ranging from ratification, effective work of the Conference of States Parties, to robust implementation. The author emphasizes the importance of securing the rapid entry into force of the ATT and of safeguarding the participation of the largest arms-trading nations. Otherwise, the ATT will stay a rather imperfect treaty failing to counteract the severe consequences of illicit and unregulated arms trade.

Download

Comments are closed
« Page 1 »

Sanctions and the Effort to Globalize Natural Resources Governance
Enrico Carisch, Loraine Rickard-Martin
International Policy Analysis
ISBN 978-3-86498-441-9

At critical times in the past, the UN Security Council has designed various kinds of sanctions to curtail conflicts involving natural resources. The dearth of consequences for violations of these UN sanctions however indicates a continued lack of global leadership on natural resources. As many resource-rich countries in Africa are replacing industrialized nations as their most important trading partners, they increasingly bypass the evolving framework of Western norms and standards. This publication analyzes the new threats to international peace and security and emphasizes the need for a coordinated response of the industrialized West and the resource-rich South.
Download

Preparing for a UN Emergency Peace Service

H. Peter Langille
FES Perspective

August 2012
ISBN 978-3-86498-229-3

This publication emphasizes the need for a United Nations Emergency Peace Service (UNEPS) and analyzes its key roles and requirements. UNEPS aims to create a permanent and standing, robust, highly trained and well-equipped UN military formation under the command of the Security Council. The author underlines that the UNEPS would ensure a prompt, effective response to armed conflicts and genocide, protect civilians, help-rebuilding and ensure collective peace and security. Furthermore, it would renew confidence in the UN as an organization, especially in its capacity and commitment to fulfill assigned tasks. The author concludes with recommendations for the next concrete steps towards such a UNEPS.
Download

Egypt’s Regional Security Policy after the January 25 Revolution
Abdul-Monem Al-Mashat
FES Perspective

July 2012
ISBN 978-3-86498-227-9

After the end of President Mubarak’s regime Egypt is facing different regional and internal challenges. This publication analyzes the potential threats emanating from the Egyptian geo-strategic location, its neighboring countries, in particular Israel, Turkey and Iran as well as Egypt’s domestic socioeconomic and political dynamics, caused by the transition from authoritarianism to democracy. Based on this analysis, the author envisions three major possible scenarios for the region’s near future: a cooperative and peaceful Middle East; a disintegrative and conflictive region; an explosive and intolerable status quo. He emphasizes that negotiations, characterized by compromises and mutual respect, with all regional players are of great importance in order to maintain peace and stability in this region. For Egypt as a central regional power, such an outcome would be in the country’s interest, too.
Download

BRICS in Global Governance – A Progressive Force?
Niu Haibin
FES Perspective
April 2012
ISBN: 978-3-86498-138-8

 

On the regional level the BRICS States have proven to be strong players in maintaining regional security and dealing with economic challenges. Given their increasing economic size they are also gaining influence on the international stage. This publication analyzes the role of the emerging powers with regard to the reform of the Security Council, the G20 and the international financial institutions.
Reforming the current global institutions has become a priority issue for emerging powers who want their values and visions reflected in the future world order. While the BRICS States have been able to coordinate their politics on a number of issues, for example by contributing to the global recovery plan of the G20, this political unity is lacking with regards to the SC reform, which makes the reform process even tougher. In sum, the author sees the need for a mutual and gradual adaption of the emerging powers into the system to make global governance structures more representative and effective.
Download

From Preparations to Negotiations for an Arms Trade Treaty
Katherine Prizeman
FES International Policy Analysis
March 2012

A majority of states is of the opinion that arms transfers should operate according to a common set of international standards. Hence, there is general support for negotiating an Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), set to commence in July 2012. But as this International Policy Analysis highlights, numerous still-contentious issues must be addressed regarding the ultimate objective of such a treaty. This publication analyzes the complex political hurdles towards a legally-binding ATT. Subsequently, possibilities for compromise and for the investment of political capital that are likely to increase the chances of negotiating a robust ATT are presented. Lastly, it makes the case for establishing solid processes for implementation and review beyond July 2012.
Download

Global Threats and the Role of United Nations Sanctions
Enrico Carisch and Loraine Rickard-Martin
FES International Policy Analysis
December 2011

After the end of the Cold War, the UN Security Council has increasingly deployed sanctions as a coercive tool in response to peace and security threats. This International Policy Analysis describes how sanctions have evolved from a blunt tool to a precision instrument. It also analyzes the ongoing challenges to the UN sanction regime and the need to improve the coherence among different actors, such as national governments, private sector, NGOs and regional organizations. The authors explain why targeted sanctions are not a panacea and what is needed to improve further UN sanctions regimes.
Download

The Security Council’s Credibility Problem
Richard Gowan
FES Perspective
December 2011

In this new FES New York Perspective Richard Gowan argues that 2011 was ultimately a disappointing year for the UN Security Council. Although initially playing a central role in the international response to the crises in Libya and Côte d’Ivoire, the Council lost momentum as its members fell out over the Libyan war and the Syrian crisis. As the loss of credibility is viewed differently by Western and non-Western Council members, in the near future their cooperation on strengthening the Council’s capabilities for conflict prevention would be the best way to restore some faith in the Council.
Download

Minding the Gap: Approaches and Challenges to Robust Civilian Protection
Robert Schütte
FES Perspective
December 2011

In the last two decades the international community’s toolbox for the protection of civilians from mass atrocity crimes has evolved gradually. Today, not only exists a multitude of non-coercive measures, but also a wide array of robust and coercive forms of intervention. Chapter-VII-mandated Peacekeeping missions or Mass Atrocity Response Operations (MARO) serve as vivid examples. However, a comprehensive doctrine for the implementation of civilian protection is currently not at hand, which leads, according to Robert Schütte, to sketchy mission objectives and ill prepared troop deployment. Schütte argues in favor of a comprehensive and UN-wide doctrine for the protection of civilians, which would explicitly define the role of civil and military components in protecting civilians in conflict environments.
Download

Reforming the Working Methods of the UN Security Council
Colin Keating
FES Perspective
December 2011

This FES Perspective argues that the continuing discussion about the reform of the UN Security Council should not only focus on the highly contentious issues of composition and membership. Rather, attention should be given to low-profile measure such as the overhauling of the body’s procedural practices. Colin Keating demonstrates that the improvement of the Council’s working methods could serve as a relatively quick fix for boosting the body’s overall performance. Procedural reforms appear to be a less controversial issue among Member States, and do not require any interminable amendment of the Charter. Among the first measures to be implemented are a revitalized focus on Peacebuilding, better involvement of troop-contributing countries, and the development of a proactive culture of conflict prevention.
Download

Fools Rush in Where Angels Fear to Tread – Challenges for South Sudan and the International Community
Angus Clarkson
FES Perspective
November 2011

This FES Perspective argues that state building to promote lasting peace for South Sudan is a long-term political process. International involvement in South Sudan faces a paradox in that constructive engagement can yield the positive outcomes it seeks only in the long-term, whereas rushed or ill-conceived engagement can do harm in the short term. The author argues that meaningful international support should appreciate the security dilemmas and political pressures of South Sudan and gauge the nature of their partnership and content of their policies toward the new state accordingly.
Download

Reform of the Security Council – a new approach?
Alischa Kugel
FES Briefing Paper No. 12
2009

UN Member States have been discussing reform of the Security Council for decades without major breakthroughs. This Briefing Paper takes a close look at the current round of deliberations, drawing upon interviews with UN Member States and the analysis of UN reports. The author concludes that the negotiations do provide for a newly forged – albeit still shaky – common ground on which progress can be made.
Download

Does the UN Peacebuilding Commission change the mode of peacebuilding in Africa?
Severine M. Rugumamu
FES Briefing Paper No. 8
2009

The UN Peacebuilding Commission (PBC) serves as a dedicated institutional mechanism for post-conflict responds, addressing the fragmentary nature of peacebuilding initiatives by the UN and outside actors. Analyzing the PBC’s strategies in Sierra Leone and Burundi, this paper argues that while the PBC offers rudimentary new approaches to peacebuilding, many shortcomings within the PBC and the international development regime need to be addressed. The paper concludes with several policy recommendations, such as greater authority for the PBC in decision-making processes, a revision of the policy framework for war-torn economies, and reformed governance structures in post-conflict societies.
Download

The future of peacekeeping operations : fighting political fatigue and overstretch
Richard Gowan
FES Briefing Paper No. 3
2009

Drawing from the insights of an international policy debate on peacekeeping overstretch co-organized by FES, Gowan identifies major stresses of the UN and non-UN peacekeeping system. Analyzing the biggest UN (DRC) and NATO (Afghanistan) peace operations, he blames “risk transferral” and mistrust as key obstacles, driving political divergences and operational mismanagement. He proposes five policy options for greater transparency and trust, allowing better peacekeeping strategies, e.g. a head-of-government conference to foster strategic discussion.
Download

The UN, the AU and ECOWAS : a triangle for peace and security in West Africa?
Titilope Ajayi
FES Briefing Paper No. 11
2008

With peacekeeping capacities stretched thin and a new dimension of global-regional cooperation evolving e.g. with the UN-AU hybrid mission in Darfur, new questions arise on the relationship between the UN and (sub-) regional organizations. What role should the global, regional and sub-regional level play in security governance? How to use the comparative advantages of each level while ensuring complementarity and maintaining the primacy of the UN? Titilope Ajayi analyses the relationship between UN, OAU/ AU and ECOWAS in West Africa, presents lessons learnt from joint peacekeeping operations and identifies opportunities for further collaboration. The author concludes that the respective roles must be defined in a common framework, while the principle of reciprocity must inform all future UN-AU and UN-ECOWAS collaborations.
Download

Can the NPT regime be fixed or should it be abandoned?
Ramesh Thakur et al.
Occasional Papers No. 40
2008

Nuclear issues are back on the global political agenda. Apart from the day-to-day fire fighting, a more wide-ranging debate on how to tackle nuclear challenges has emerged. With this paper by Professors Ramesh Thakur, Jane Boulden and Thomas G. Weiss, FES wishes to contribute to this debate. The authors conclude provocatively that the NPT has passed its use-by date in world politics, creating a situation of “nuclear apartheid” which confronts the world with a highly precarious and unsustainable balance. They anticipate a post-NPT world of either multiplying nuclear weapons states (NWS) or one without nuclear weapons, and explore a potential role of the United Nations in underpinning, shaping, and transforming nuclear orders.
Download

“The relationship between Africa and the UN : from disenchantment to a more effective cooperation”
Volker Lehmann
Conference Report
2008

International Conference, in association with the Centre for Conflict Resolution (CCR), Cape Town, South Africa, June 20-21, 2008 in Tarrytown, New York.
This Workshop intended to strengthen the dialogue between African states and the UN. Discussions on challenges for Africa’s social and economic development, peacekeeping, and the emerging peace and security architecture highlighted the relevance of democracy and political leadership for the future of Africa-UN relations.

Download

Fighting drugs and building peace : towards policy coherence between counter-narcotics and peace building
Barnett R. Rubin and Alexandra Guáqueta
Occasional Papers No. 37
2007
ISBN 978-3-89892-8

A frequently overlooked feature of the fight against drugs is the linkages between the production of illegal narcotics and the political dynamics in post-conflict countries. Afghanistan and Colombia are cases in point. Post-conflict situations not only attract the cultivation of crops used for the production of illegal drugs. Events in Guinea-Bissau and Haiti illustrate that the same sad logic applies to the international drug mafia’s selection of trading “hot spots”. It is against this background that a debate has ensued on the policy coherence between the international community’s fight against drugs and its parallel efforts to sustain peace in post-conflict countries.
Download

The evolution of UN peacekeeping (2) : reforming DPKO
Timo Pelz and Volker Lehmann
Fact Sheet
2007

The current increase in UN peacekeeping operations has strained the institutional capacities of the UN Secretariat. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s reform, which adds to the Department of Peacekeeping Operation a new Department of Field Support, is only the last in a series of changes of the UN peacekeeping architecture aiming to balance unity of command and division of labor.
Download

The evolution of UN peacekeeping (1) : hybrid missions
Timo Pelz and Volker Lehmann
Fact Sheet
2007

The planned UN-AU hybrid peacekeeping operation in Darfur (UNAMID) will be the largest UN peacekeeping operation ever. Whereas UNAMID’s success will largely depend on the political circumstances on the ground, its evolution also demonstrates how the UN tries to muster its limited resources in response to an increasing need for peace operations.
Download

The U.N. Counter-Terrorism Committee : an institutional analysis
C. S. R. Murthy
FES Briefing Paper No. 15
2007

In his paper, C.S.R. Murty briefly outlines the genealogy of the United Nation’s counter terrorism strategies. He analyses the institutional design of the U.N. Counter-Terrorism Committee and describes its policies and activities until today. Finally, he proposes a set of policy recommendations to strengthen the committee beyond its current mandate that will end in December 2007.
Download

Between paternalism and hybrid partnership : the emerging UN and Africa relationship in peace operations
Tim Murithi
FES Briefing Paper No. 2
2007
Download

Engendering peace : how the peacebuilding commission can live up to UN Security Council resolution 1325
Thelma Ekiyor
FES Briefing Paper
2007

In 2005, UN General Assembly (UNGA) and the UN Security Council (UNSC) adopted resolutions for the creation of a new Peacebuilding Commission. The new body will serve as a subsidiary organ of the General Assembly and will “marshal resources at the disposal of the international community to advise and propose integrated strategies for post-conflict recovery, focusing attention on reconstruction, institution-building and sustainable development in countries emerging from conflict”. However, the Peacebuilding Commission is in its formative stages and provides an opportunity for gender concerns to be considered and integrated into the institution and its activities from the design stage. This paper provides suggestions for how the ideals and goals of UN Resolution 1325 can serve as a guide for engendering the Peacebuilding Commission.
Download

Asian dialogue on the UN Peacebuilding Commission – benefits and challenges : report of the conference in Islamabad
Volker Lehmann
Conference Report
2006
Download

Understanding Beijing’s policy on the Iranian nuclear issue
Liangxiang Jin
FES Briefing Paper No. 17
2006
Download

Getting the Peacebuilding Commission off the ground: including civil society
Vanessa Hawkins Wyeth
FES Briefing Paper
2006
Download

Peace building in Africa
Volker Lehmann
Conference Report
2006
Download

The UN Peacebuilding Commission: benefits and challenges
Background paper prepared by the International Peace Academy for the regional seminars organized by the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung
2006
Download

Picking up the pieces : what to expect from the peacebuilding commission
Catherine Guicherd
FES Briefing Paper
2005
Download

Em busca de um mundo mais seguro? : relatório do Grupo de Alto nível sobre as Ameaças, desafios e mudanças
Kevin Ozgercin and Jochen Steinhilber
FES Briefing Paper
2005
Download

Hacia un mundo más seguro? : Informe del Grupo de Alto nivel sobre las Amenazas, los Desafíos y el Cambio ; (UN High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change)
Kevin Ozgercin and Jochen Steinhilber.
FES Briefing Paper
2005
Download

Crisis prevention and development cooperation
Anita Sharma and Ana Grier Cutter
Overview of the workshop held on April 19, 2000
2000
Download